Loss, and restitution

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Letter: 8 November 1960

German original to follow

8th November 1960

Dr Max Heyn

Berlin Wilmersdorf                                                                                                            MecklenburgischeStrasse 57 St/Hu

Mr Werner Weissenberg

16 Hammerstones Road

Elland

Yorkshire

England

Compensation in respect of Frau Else Weissenberg, with reference to my letter to you concerning the President of the district of Cologne of 13.10.60.

Dear Mr Weissenberg

Enclosed are the photocopies of your documents for your acknowledgement. I have retained the originals for my records. The original correspondence from the President of the Cologne District of 26th October 1960 asks for immediate transmissional copies, or copies authenticated by the consulate, required by the President of the District.

Furthermore, I ask you to send me a lebenslauf [CV] of your mother again, but this time with a date and a signature; in case you no longer have this document regarding her life story I take the liberty of writing to you, the contents as follows.

Lebenslauf

My mother was born in the district of Oppeln, Upper Silesia, in 1882. She attended a High School for Girls and amongst other occupations she worked as Secretary in Osnabruck. She married in 1910 and my parents ran a shop in Pless (Upper Silesia). At the start of the First World War my father was conscripted into the German Army. During the war he was wounded twice; he remained in the Army until the end of the war. The shop in Pless was sold and during the period after the war my parents lived in Tost (Upper Silesia) and in later years in an apartment in Gleiwitz. After the war my father earned his living by acting as a travelling sales representative for two or three firms. After 1933 many of his contacts were broken off. My father died in 1941 as a result of a Police Detention, as far as I can tell from the small details I was given at the time. A tendency to heart problems developed into heart failure and was responsible for his premature death.

In May 1942 my mother together with her mother, aged nearly 90, was forced to leave her flat in Gleiwitz, in order, according to a letter received from a friend, to be deported to Poland. Probably my mother and grandmother perished in Auschwitz. Neither I, nor any other person known to me, have received any sign of life. My attempts, after the end of the war to establish their fate from the Red Cross or other aid agencies whose name escapes me have been successful.

I ask you for a speedy settlement.

Yours faithfully

Max Heyn


Letter: no date

nd: WW to Max Heyn, page one
nd: WW to Max Heyn, page one
nd: WW to Max Heyn, page two
nd: WW to Max Heyn, page two

 

16 Hammerstones Road

Elland

Yorks

Dr Max Heyn

Berlin-Wilmersdorf

Dear Lawyer

In reply to your letter of 19th November, including the enclosure, I must admit again that I am not familiar with the legal terminology and therefore my following remarks are necessarily incomplete.

As far as I can judge, the requirements under Paragraph 3 in the insurance arrangements for employees from 12th November 1959 are relevant to me, as my present employment as teacher here requires contributions towards insurance and eventually entitles me to an old age pension, the sum of which is dependent on the number of insurance contributions. For that reason the decision by the insurance establishment for the Federal Government of Germany is incorrect.

The date of the 1st November 1937 as mentioned: I cannot recall this, even after searching my memory, so it is meaningless. As a result I cannot understand what is meant by civil service employees claims for maintenance. The only evidence in this respect is gathered from your circular of the 18th August 1956, in which on page XIII there is talk of compensation for maintenance and there is a reference to private insurance.

In 1937 I was employed by the Philanthropin in Frankfurt. As far as I know this was a state school before 1933 – a Jewish High School, which was part of the usual insurance system. I do not remember in what way the employees’ insurance was charged by the authorities since 1933. Nor do I know if the school was responsible for including me in a private insurance scheme in 1937, nor do I know an answer to the question as to whether I can expect any payments if I was included in this scheme in the future. Perhaps the insurance scheme for employees have evidence which they can give you, as to how it would be possible for me to obtain loss of insurance payments or eventually a pension.

Yours faithfully

Werner Weissenberg