Research websites

Please note: all descriptions are those of the institutions listed

Institutions are listed in the order in which they were consulted for this research


http://www.yadvashem.org

As the Jewish people’s living memorial to the Holocaust, Yad Vashem safeguards the memory of the past and imparts its meaning for future generations. As the Jewish people’s living memorial to the Holocaust, Yad Vashem safeguards the memory of the past and imparts its meaning for future generations.

Established in 1953, as the world center for documentation, research, education and commemoration of the Holocaust, Yad Vashem is today a dynamic and vital place of intergenerational and international encounter. Established in 1953, as the world center for documentation, research, education and commemoration of the Holocaust, Yad Vashem is today a dynamic and vital place of intergenerational and international encounter.


https://wienerholocaustlibrary.org

The Wiener Holocaust Library is the world’s oldest and Britain’s largest collection of original archival material on the Nazi era and the Holocaust. 

The Library has its origins in the work of Dr Alfred Wiener, who campaigned against Nazism during the 1920s and 30s and gathered evidence about antisemitism and the persecution of Jews in Germany.

Dr Wiener and his family fled Germany in 1933 and settled in Amsterdam. Later that year he set up the Jewish Central Information Office (JCIO) at the request of the Board of Deputies of British Jews and the Anglo-Jewish Association. This archive collected information about the Nazis, which formed the basis of campaigns to undermine their activities.

Following the November Pogrom of 1938, Wiener prepared to bring his collection to the UK. It arrived the following summer and is believed to have opened on the day the Nazis invaded Poland.

Throughout the War the JCIO served the British Government as it fought the Nazi regime. Increasingly the collection was referred to as ‘Dr Wiener’s Library’ and eventually this led to its renaming.

[The Library holds] some of the earliest accounts produced by survivors of the Holocaust, as well as collections of Nazi documents and photographs, and hundreds of unique collections relating to the experiences of Jewish refugee families who came to Britain in the 1930s and 1940s.

Shattered, an exhibition at Wiener Holocaust Library, London. Image source: C Weissenberg, pers. archive


http://www.lbi.org

The Leo Baeck Institute — New York | Berlin (LBI) is devoted to the history of German-speaking Jews. Its 80,000-volume library and extensive archival and art collections represent the most significant repository of primary source material and scholarship on the Jewish communities of Central Europe over the past five centuries. The Leo Baeck Institute — New York | Berlin (LBI) is devoted to the history of German-speaking Jews. Its 80,000-volume library and extensive archival and art collections represent the most significant repository of primary source material and scholarship on the Jewish communities of Central Europe over the past five centuries.

German-speaking Jews had a history marked by individual as well as collective accomplishments and played a significant role in shaping art, science, business, and political developments in the modern era, as evidenced by the continuing relevance of figures such as Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, and Franz Kafka. German-speaking Jews had a history marked by individual as well as collective accomplishments and played a significant role in shaping art, science, business, and political developments in the modern era, as evidenced by the continuing relevance of figures such as Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, and Franz Kafka.

LBI is committed to preserving this legacy and has digitized over 3.5 million pages of documents from its collections—from rare renaissance books to the personal correspondence of luminaries and ordinary people alike, to community histories and official documents. LBI also promotes the study and understanding of German-Jewish history through its public programs, exhibitions, and support for research and scholars. LBI is committed to preserving this legacy and has digitized over 3.5 million pages of documents from its collections—from rare renaissance books to the personal correspondence of luminaries and ordinary people alike, to community histories and official documents. LBI also promotes the study and understanding of German-Jewish history through its public programs, exhibitions, and support for research and scholars.

For one research area of the present website, see for example:

http://digifindingaids.cjh.org/?pID=478103#a1
This collection of the LBI contains documents related to Albert Friedrich Hirsch, his family and the Philanthropin School in Frankfurt am Main, at which Hirsch was headmaster. Prominent topics are emigration and the school’s fate under the Nazi regime as well as the attempts of its former pupils and faculty to stay in touch after 1945. The papers in this collection include some original material from the late 19th century through World War I and the “Third Reich” as well as several typescripts from the 1950s and 1960s that are related to a memorial book, which was eventually published in 1964.


https://arolsen-archives.org

Arolsen Archives (was the International Tracing Service – ITS) in Bad Arolsen declares its commitment to keep the memory of the millions of victims of Nazi persecution alive. The archive’s collections about persecution, forced labour and the Holocaust are unique in scope and significance.

The ITS preserves these historical records, answers the requests of survivors and family menbers of victims and makes use of the collections for research and education. The ITS archives store about 30 million documents which can help to shed light on the fate of so many.

The alphabetically and phonetically arranged Central Name Index contains over 50 million reference cards for over 17.5 million people and is the main key to the documents and the correspondence files. The ITS collections comprise information about incarceration, forced labour, the post-War period (displaced persons) and the child tracing branch.

To preserve, conserve and open up the ITS archives to public access; to modernise and make more effective its services to Nazi victims and Holocaust survivors and those who seek to trace the fate of family members persecuted by the Nazis and their allies; and to integrate the ITS into the European and international network of research and educational institutions focused on Nazi persecution, the Holocaust forced labour and displaced persons.

Arolsen Archives, A visit 2019. Image source: C Weissenberg, pers. archives


http://www.sztetl.org.pl/en/

Virtual Shtetl is the largest local Jewish history database in the world. Through it, many activities, projects and initiatives are inspired and organised which aim to preserve and promote Poland’s multicultural heritage. Our portal also promotes, within younger generations, a spirit of mutual tolerance and respect towards Jewish tradition and culture. The Virtual Shtetl is the largest local Jewish history database in the world. Through it, many activities, projects and initiatives are inspired and organised which aim to preserve and promote Poland’s multicultural heritage. Our portal also promotes, within younger generations, a spirit of mutual tolerance and respect towards Jewish tradition and culture.


http://www.cjh.org

The Center for Jewish History in New York City illuminates history, culture, and heritage. The Center provides a collaborative home for five partner organizations: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

The partners’ archives comprise the world’s largest and most comprehensive archive of the modern Jewish experience outside of Israel. The collections span a thousand years, with more than 5 miles of archival documents (in dozens of languages and alphabet systems), more than 500,000 volumes, as well as thousands of artworks, textiles, ritual objects, recordings, films, and photographs.


http://www.ajr.org.uk

The Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR) provides social, welfare and care services to Jewish victims of Nazi oppression living in Great Britain. The Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR) provides social, welfare and care services to Jewish victims of Nazi oppression living in Great Britain.

Founded in 1941 by Jewish refugees from central Europe, the AJR has extensive experience attending to the needs of Holocaust refugees and survivors who settled in Britain. Founded in 1941 by Jewish refugees from central Europe, the AJR has extensive experience attending to the needs of Holocaust refugees and survivors who settled in Britain.


https://www.worldjewishrelief.org

[World Jewish Relief] We are the British Jewish community’s international humanitarian agency. Inspired by Jewish values, we empower people in poverty to live with dignity, self-reliance and hope. We support the world’s poorest Jewish communities, predominantly in Eastern Europe, because kol arayvim zeh la’zeh – all Jews are responsible for one another. We work beyond our community, inspired by the Jewish values of caring for the stranger and recognising the dignity and potential of all people.


http://www.volksbund.de/home.html

Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge e. V. is a humanitarian organization charged by the government of the Federal Republic of Germany with recording, maintaining and caring for the graves of German war casualties abroad. The Volksbund provides information to relatives on all matters related to war graves, advises public and private institutions, promotes international cooperation in the area of war grave maintenance and encourages young people to come together to learn at the last resting places of war casualties.


http://www.ushmm.org

A living memorial to the Holocaust, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum inspires citizens and leaders worldwide to confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity. Federal support guarantees the Museum’s permanent place on the National Mall, and its far-reaching educational programs and global impact are made possible by generous donors. A living memorial to the Holocaust, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum inspires citizens and leaders worldwide to confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity. Federal support guarantees the Museum’s permanent place on the National Mall, and its far-reaching educational programs and global impact are made possible by generous donors.

Located among our national monuments to freedom on the National Mall, the Museum provides a powerful lesson in the fragility of freedom, the myth of progress, and the need for vigilance in preserving democratic values.


http://www.bundesarchiv.de/index.html.en

[The Bundesarchiv is] a modern provider of services for the general public as well as research and administration bodies. We document, and save as archives, testimonies to, and evidence of, modern and contemporary German history and make this information available to everyone. We maintain the civil and military archives of the Federal Republic of Germany and its predecessors, the German Confederation, the German Reich and the German Democratic Republic, on the basis of the Federal Archives Act, and supplement these with archives of private origin.

We make decisions concerning permanent value, describe the archives, and make these available for the public after consideration of protection laws. We also offer advice and information to our users. We maintain archives and libraries for the long term by professionally storing and conserving them and, if necessary, restoring and microfilming or digitalising them for protection. We preserve, on a sustained basis, archives that have originated in electronic form and make these accessible.


http://www.stolpersteine-hamburg.de

The horror didn’t start in Auschwitz,
Treblinka or in other camps …
… it started in our neighborhood,
in our house, outside our door.

Since 1995, Cologne based artist Gunter Demnig has been commemorating the victims of the German Nazi regime through his project “Stolpersteine” – Stumbling Stones. All over Germany, the artist has been laying small memorial stones in sidewalks and pavements outside those houses where the people lived or worked who were persecuted and murdered by the Nazi regime. In 2002 the first Stumbling Stone was laid in Hamburg and many followed ever since.


http://www.leonoregoldschmidt.com

This website presents an account of the Dr Leonore Goldschmidt Schule, a Jewish school, which opened in 1935 in Berlin. It was closed in 1939 in Germany, but survived in England until 1941, when conditions of WWII made it impossible to continue.

The manuscript is based on research from original documents, archival information and memory of the author, Dr Gertrude H, Thompson. … The archival materials used in this story have been deposited in the Steven Spielberg Film and Video Archive of the USHMM, Washington, DC.


http://gen.scatteredmind.co.uk

Descendants of my earliest known ancestors by family line.


https://cbj.jhi.pl

Centralna Biblioteka Judaistyczna (Central Jewish Library) is one of the major world repositories of digitized Judaica, available for free via the Internet. The CJL presents books, works of art, old prints, manuscripts, archival materials, ephemera, and newspapers, housed by the Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw (ŻIH).

The mission of the CJL is not only to make available all collections of the Jewish Historical Institute, but also to provide digital tools for scholars, teachers, genealogists and those interested in the culture and history of the Polish Jews.

The CJL’s database includes the Ringelblum Archive, the Underground Archive of the Warsaw Ghetto, a priceless collection of over 35, 000 documents registered by UNESCO as a part of the Memory of the World program. Our ongoing digital projects include the digital edition of the Ringelblum Archive and the graphs function offering an alternative mode of presenting data available through the Ringelblum Archive.

The collections available via the Central Jewish Library are digitized, curated and edited by the Digitization Department and the scholars of the Jewish Historical Institute.


http://szufladamalgosi.pl/author/_hipcia/

Are you looking for Jewish ancestors in Silesia?

I can help you find all available information and data concerning Jewish ancestors of pre-war Silesia and also organize individual heritage tours.

Małgorzata Płoszaj, Jewish history researcher, December 2016. Image source: C Weissenberg, pres. archive


https://www.sandwichguildhallmuseum.co.uk

The Sandwich archive is currently offline

Sandwich Guildhall Archive exists to present and interpret the history of the Ancient Town and Cinque Port of Sandwich and its immediate surrounding areas … [It] has collections of books, documents, photographs, postcards, maps and objects with relevance to the history of the Ancient Town & Cinque Port of Sandwich. Appointments can be made to view documents on Monday and Wednesday afternoons between 2.30pm & 4.00pm.

Sandwich Guildhall, 2018


http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com

“If you want to be happy, set yourself a goal that commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, and inspires your hopes. Happiness is within you. It comes from doing some certain thing into which you can put all your thought and energy. If you want to be happy, get enthusiastic about something.”
–Dale Carnegie

The Museum of Family History is a virtual (Internet-only), multimedia, and interactive creation that was designed for those of us who are interested in learning more about modern Jewish history, as well as those who were a part of this history, who now grace the many branches of our family tree. The Museum humbly attempts to honor the Jewish people and the Jewish family unit in particular.

Through various exhibitions of sight and sound, the Museum strives to keep the memories of our ancestors fresh in our minds, while at the same time allowing us to learn more about the historical events that might have touched and shaped their lives, and subsequently our own. Through first-hand accounts, we learn of both their struggles and their triumphs, and through this awareness we perhaps gain some understanding of the world in which they lived.

You, the participant in this often sentimental and nostalgic journey, have the opportunity to view thousands photographs from the past that may stir your imagination. You will at times hear the voices and see film clips of family members that have been gingerly incorporated into some of the Museum’s exhibitions.


http://www.jewishgen.org

JewishGen is committed to ensuring Jewish continuity for present generations and the generations yet to come. Our free, easy to use website features thousands of databases, research tools and other resources to help those with Jewish ancestry research and find family members. JewishGen’s mission is to encourage the preservation of Jewish heritage, allowing anyone with Jewish ancestry to research their roots, connect with relatives, and learn about their family history.


http://cahjp.huji.ac.il

The Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People (CAHJP) were established in 1939. They hold the archives of hundreds of Jewish communities, as well as of local, national and international Jewish organizations and the private collections of many outstanding Jewish personalities. The Archives now hold the most extensive collection of documents, pinkassim (registers) and other records of Jewish history from the Middle Ages to the present day.

The Board of Directors is composed of representatives of the Government of Israel, The Historical Society of Israel, The Jewish Agency for Israel, The Israeli Academy of Sciences and Humanities, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel-Aviv University and Bar-Ilan University.

On January 30, 2013 The Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People and the National Library of Israel (NLI) signed an agreement to implement a merger between the Archives and the Library.

By joining the Library the Archives will be able to avail themselves of the Library’s resources and facilities to gain access to more and more repositories of Jewish archival material and to make the contents of their vast holdings more available to a wider public.


http://www.ajhs.org

The American Jewish Historical Society is the oldest ethnic, cultural archive in the United States. AJHS provides access to more than 25 million documents and 50,000 books, photographs, art and artifacts that reflect the history of the Jewish presence in the United States from 1654 to the present.

At our home on West 16th street in downtown Manhattan, as well as in our Boston branch on Newbury street, AJHS illuminates American Jewish history through our many archival treasures, scholarship, exhibitions, and public programs. Among the treasures of this heritage are the handwritten original of Emma Lazarus’ The New Colossus, which graces the Statue of Liberty; records of the nation’s leading Jewish communal organizations, and important collections in the fields of education, philanthropy, science, sports, business, and the arts.

JTA is the definitive, trusted global source of breaking news and analysis on issues of Jewish interest and concern. We are a not-for-profit organization that prides itself on producing compelling, credible, independent, and high-quality journalism. Our reporting reflects the wide spectrum of religious, political and cultural identity within the Jewish community, with our digital properties serving as a town square where Jews of all stripes can debate with and learn about each other.

We keep Jews and Jewish communities worldwide informed and connected, within New York, Washington, Jerusalem, and dozens of other cities around the globe. Our global reporting provides extensive coverage of political, economic and social developments affecting Jews in North and South America, Israel, Europe, Africa and Australia. JTA reporting also shines a spotlight on the cultural happenings, influential thinkers and leaders, and milestone events that are defining the Jewish experience today.


http://www.haaretz.com

The online edition of Haaretz Newspaper in Israel, and analysis from Israel and the Middle East. Haaretz.com provides extensive and in-depth coverage of Israel, the Jewish World and the Middle East, including defense, diplomacy, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the peace process, Israeli politics, Jerusalem affairs, international relations, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, the Palestinian Authority, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, the Israeli business world and Jewish life in Israel and the Diaspora.


http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org

The aim of H.E.A.R.T is to inform and educate people about the Holocaust and the extermination programs conducted by the Nazi regime throughout Europe during the Second World War. H.E.A.R.T research and material is contributed from a group of independent Holocaust researchers who devote their spare time to research for the production of this website and other forms of related publications, such as leaflets and books. H.E.A.R.T is run by its trustees and directors, who manage the daily administration of the website, review all research materials, fact checking, and addressing any required corrections.


https://www.aip.org

The American Institute of Physics advances, promotes and serves the physical sciences for the benefit of humanity. As a federation of physical science societies, AIP offers programs, products and services that:

Advance and distribute the knowledge of the physical sciences and its applications; enhance and cultivate the physical sciences disciplines; enable and foster collaborative efforts among stakeholders in the physical sciences; and promote the physical sciences to the public, leaders, government officials, agencies, and the media. AIP Member Societies cover a broad range of fields in the physical sciences and collectively represent more than 120,000 scientists, engineers, educators and students in the global physical sciences community.


https://www.jri-poland.org//

Holocaust survivors and their families, as well as pre-war Jewish immigrants from Poland and their descendants, may be unaware that a remarkable number of Jewish records of Poland have survived the upheavals of history and the ravages of war. Jewish Records Indexing – Poland (JRI-Poland) has created indices/extractions to more than 6.1 million Jewish birth, marriage and death records from current and former territories of Poland that are housed in Poland today.

Indices/extractions to vital records more than 100-years old are searchable on the JRI-Poland online database. JRI-Poland can also direct researchers to detailed information on how to find records less than 100-years old from specific towns now in Poland and in the Lviv, Ternopil or Ivano Frankivsk districts of Ukraine.

In addition to vital records, the JRI-Poland online database includes other types of records such as Books of Residents, censuses, army draft lists, school records, cemetery burials, Polish passports, ghetto death records, birth, marriage and death announcements in Polish newspapers and post-war court and legal announcements in official newspapers (Monitor Polski). The data varies widely by town or region.


https://www.sbc.org.pl/dlibra

The Silesian Digital Library (SDL) was established by the agreement between the Silesian Library in Katowice and the Silesian University signed on 20th July 2006.
The mission of the project is to present online the cultural heritage of Silesia in its historic and contemporary diversity, publish the scientific property of the region and support teaching and educational activities.
The coordinator of the actions associated with the creation of the SDL is the Silesian Library in Katowice. It also supports the SDL hardware and software platform.
Resources published in the Silesian Digital Library are available to non-commercial users free of charge. Conditions of commercial use of the SDL materials depend on the decision of copyright owners of digital publications.
Each member of the Silesian Digital Library maintains rights to digital publication and determines the period of its availability.
Owing to the fact that the SDL has been included in the national system of digital libraries, it also enables direct access to materials published in other regional digital libraries (go to: Remote digital libraries).
Descriptions of publications of the Silesian Digital Library are indexed and can be searched by global search engines.


http://www.pryzmat.pwr.edu.pl

Wrocław University of Technology

The University of Wrocław has a rich history of more than three centuries. Founded by Leopold I Habsburg the university evolved from a modest school run by Jesuits into one of the biggest academic institutions in Poland. At the beginning of the 19th century the university had five Faculties: philosophy, catholic theology, evangelical theology, law and medicine. Later it was expanded by numerous sections, laboratories and a natural museum, which exists until today.


http://www.tracingthepast.org

Tracing the Past was founded in 2014 as a registered non-profit organization in Berlin, Germany, by a like-minded group of Berliners consisting primarily of historians. Current contributors include archivists and information technology experts working in many facets of Holocaust history and provenance research.


https://cemetery.jewish.org.pl

Our database includes all inscriptions we collected in Jewish cemeteries at locations listed under the “Database” tab. The list is being expanded as we index subsequent cemeteries.

The cataloging process in Warsaw took place between 2006 and 2010. All remaining Mazovian Jewish cemeteries were indexed in 2010-2011. In 2012 we have founded the Foundation for Documentation of Jewish Cemeteries to continue indexing Jewish cemeteries in Poland.


https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk

The British Newspaper Archive is a partnership between the British Library and Findmypast to digitise the British Library’s vast collection of newspapers.

We are scanning millions of pages of historical newspapers and making them available online for the first time ever.

You can now search hundreds of millions of articles by keyword, name, location, date or title and watch your results appear in an instant.

The British Newspaper Archive contains around three million pages of newspaper content originally funded as part of a £3m contribution from JISC. This was an important initiative that contributed greatly to the British Library’s digitisation of their historic newspapers. 


https://www.findmypast.co.uk

Owned by publishing giant DC Thomson and a global player in the family history market, Findmypast‘s mission is simple. We want to help everyone discover and celebrate how they are uniquely connected. Our family of brands, billions of digitised records and clever site tools are creating those new connections and discoveries every day.


https://www.findmypast.co.uk/1939register

The 1939 Register

At the outbreak of World War II, the government urgently needed to know everything it could about the civil population of England and Wales. This information would be key in the issuing of identity cards and ration books as well as organising conscription and, after the war, creating the N.H.S.

To gather this information, they took a National Register. On September 29th, 1939, the personal details – including names, dates of birth, occupations, marital statuses – of 41 million individuals were recorded.

This release is the result of over a year’s work carried out by a team of hundreds who – in association with The National Archives – have conserved, scanned, transcribed and digitised over 1.2 million pages from 7,000 volumes, comprising the most significant record release of the decade, and one of the most important documents in modern British history. To put the scale of the work into context, were you to stack the books on top of each other, they would be 227m high, over double the height of St Paul’s Cathedral.


http://muzeum-miejskie-zabrze.pl/index.php

Początki Muzeum Miejskiego w Zabrzu sięgają 1935 roku, kiedy to 3 października, przewodniczący Prowincji Górnośląskiej zatwierdził wniosek nadburmistrza Zabrza Maksa Filluscha o utworzeniu Städtische Heimatstube Hindenburg czyli Miejskiej Izby Regionalnej. Pierwszą siedzibę izby stanowiły dwa pokoje w willi dyrektora rzeźni miejskiej przy obecnej ulicy Szczęść Boże 32a, przekazane 20 lutego 1936 roku. Ekspozycję, na którą składały się zbiory zabrzańskiego nauczyciela i pierwszego kierownika izby, Kurtha Vietha i Archiwum Miejskiego w Zabrzu, udostępniono 1 kwietnia 1936 roku. Ponieważ pomieszczenia przy ul. Szczęść Boże szybko stały się zbyt ciasne, dwa lata później, 29 maja 1938 roku izbę przeniesiono do nowej siedziby na parterze kamienicy przy obecnym placu Krakowskim 9, którą wcześniej odebrano żydowskiej rodzinie Borinski. Do kamienicy wprowadziła się już jako Städtische Heimatmuseum (Miejskie Muzeum Regionalne). Od 1936 roku kierownikiem izby, a następnie muzeum był inspektor miejski, Teodor Jurok.

Google translate: The beginnings of the City Museum in Zabrze date back to 1935, when on October 3, the chairman of the Upper Silesian Province approved the motion of the mayor of Zabrze, Max Fillusch, to establish the Städtische Heimatstube Hindenburg, i.e. the Municipal Regional Chamber. The first seat of the chamber consisted of two rooms in the villa of the director of the municipal slaughterhouse at the present 32a Szczęść Boga Street, handed over on February 20, 1936. The exhibition, which consisted of the collections of a teacher from Zabrze and the first head of the chamber, Kurth Vieth and the Zabrze City Archives, was opened on April 1, 1936. Because the premises at ul. God bless, they quickly became too cramped, two years later, on May 29, 1938, the room was moved to a new seat on the ground floor of the tenement house at today’s Krakowski 9 Square, which had previously been taken from the Jewish family of Borinski. It has already moved into the tenement house as the Städtische Heimatmuseum (Municipal Regional Museum). From 1936, the head of the chamber and then the museum was the city inspector, Teodor Jurok.


https://szukajwarchiwach.pl

Szukaj w Archiwach to serwis, którego celem jest udostępnienie w internecie opisów materiałów archiwalnych z archiwów państwowych i innych instytucji. Większość z nich prezentujemy wraz ze skanami. Dzięki temu możliwe jest korzystanie ze zgromadzonych zbiorów bez wychodzenia z domu. Dostęp jest całkowicie otwarty – nie wymaga logowania i jest bezpłatny.
Pomysłodawcą, twórcą i administratorem serwisu jest Narodowe Archiwum Cyfrowe. Pierwsza wersja ukazała się w 2009 roku i od tamtej pory wciąż udoskonalamy serwis, żeby spełniał Wasze oczekiwania.

Google translate: Archives Search is a website whose purpose is to make available online descriptions of archival materials from state archives and other institutions. Most of them are presented with scans. Thanks to this, it is possible to use the collected collections without leaving your home. Access is completely open – no login required and free. The originator, creator and administrator of the website is the National Digital Archives. The first version was released in 2009 and since then we have been constantly improving the website to meet your expectations.


https://www.holocaust.cz

Portál holocaust.cz představuje obsáhlý a unikátní zdroj informací k tématu holocaustu, rasismu a antisemitismu. Jeho cílem je všem zájemcům o danou problematiku poskytnout spolehlivé a ověřené informace. Editoři portálu kladou důraz na to, aby události holocaustu byly především podnětem k přemýšlení o dějinách i současnosti. Portál byl spuštěn v roce 2001 a od té doby patří k nejrozsáhlejším zdrojům informací o holocaustu v češtině. Tematicky se soustřeďuje zejména na oblast českých zemí, zasazuje však události v této oblasti do celkového evropského kontextu.

Google translate: The holocaust.cz portal is a comprehensive and unique source of information on the subject of the Holocaust, racism and anti-Semitism. Its goal is to provide all interested parties with reliable and verified information. The editors of the portal emphasize that the events of the Holocaust should primarily be a stimulus to think about history and the present. The portal was launched in 2001 and since then has been one of the most extensive sources of information about the Holocaust in Czech. Thematically, it focuses mainly on the Czech lands, but places events in this area in the overall European context.


http://www.steinheim-institut.de:50580/cgi-bin/epidat

[The Steinheim Institut] Epidat – The Database of Jewish epigraphy – provides the inventory, documentation, editions and presentation of epigraphical collections. Currently online are available 227 digital editions with 39852 epitaphs (78739 image files).


http://archives.jdc.org

Comprising the organizational records of JDC, the overseas rescue, relief, and rehabilitation arm of the American Jewish community, the JDC Archives houses one of the most significant collections in the world for the study of modern Jewish history.

With records of activity in over 90 countries dating from 1914 to the present, the JDC Archives is an extraordinary and unique treasure in the archival world. The JDC Archives is located in two centers, one at JDC’s NY headquarters and the second in Jerusalem, and is open to the public by appointment.

On this site, you can view galleries, exhibits, and topically arranged content ; learn about the documents and finding aids, photos, artifacts, films, oral histories, and indexed names available in Our Collections; and conduct research in our online database.


http://gurs.free.fr/liste.html

[Gurs] Ce site propose plusieurs listes – Diverses listes 1939-1945, Fichier des internés de Borgo San Dalmazzo, Fichier des internés de St Cyprien (3858 noms d’internés de St Cyprien transférés à Gurs en octobre 1940), Liste des juifs de Belgique ( avant 10/5/1940) déportés de France et survivants, Liste des résistants juifs de Belgique, Liste divers camps d’internement français, Recensement des juifs de Lyon 1941, Recensements des juifs de l’Allier.

Google translate: This site offers several lists – Various lists 1939-1945 – File of internees of Borgo San Dalmazzo – File of internees of St Cyprien (3858 names of internees of St Cyprien transferred to Gurs in October 1940) – List of Jews from Belgium (before 10/5/1940) deported from France and survivors – List of Jewish resistance fighters in Belgium – List of various French internment camps – Census of Jews in Lyon 1941 – Censuses of the Jews of the Allier and soon the lists of internees of the thousands who arrived from Gurs from 1/1941 to 12/1941.


https://jewishtraces.com

[Jewish Traces] As a deep believer in the power of creating Jewish spaces, I love visiting synagogues the world over to try to understand the local community. Architectural styles, ornament, and integration into the visual fabric can tell a lot about how the community thinks of itself in relation to the world around it. Often, that puts me in contact with former synagogues. While in Europe, the words “former synagogue” conjure images of slaughtered Jewish communities, the Jewish experience in the United States is thankfully one less violent. Here, former synagogues have much to teach about Jewish history, American history, and the ties that bind us together.


http://www.memorialdelashoah.org/en/

[Memorial de la Shoah] On April 28, 1943, during the occupation of France, Russian-born industrialist Isaac Schneersohn invited 40 activists and representatives of various currents in the Jewish community to the apartment he rented on rue Bizanet in Grenoble to discuss the possibility of creating an important underground archive.

As the Nazi occupiers were hunting down Jews with assistance from the Vichy government police, the goal was to set up an organization that would collect evidence of anti-Jewish persecution in order to bear witness and demand justice after the war. Schneersohn may not have been aware of it, but he was laying the groundwork for an international criminal justice system and the Nuremberg trials a few years later.


https://genealogy.org.il/holocaust-france-resource-guide/

Israel Genealogy Research Association: Find here a selection of books and on-line resources presenting the fate of the Jews in France during the Second World War. These may enable you to trace specific victims and/or survivors of the Holocaust in this country.